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literally dripping with watermelon juice rn

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Inmates to strike in Alabama, declare prison is “running a slave empire”

prisonbookscollective:

Inmates to strike in Alabama, declare prison is “running a slave empire”

Melvin Ray

Melvin Ray

Breaking: Reached in his cell, Free Alabama Movement leader tells Salon inmates will refuse work to end free labor

From Salon

Inmates at an Alabama prison plan to stage a work stoppage this weekend and hope to spur an escalating strike wave, a leader of the effort told Salon in a Thursday phone call from his jail cell.

“We decided that the only weapon or strategy … that we have is our…

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(via sinidentidades)

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Ave verum corpus (F. Poulenc): Choeur de Chambre Accentus

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artmastered:

Vincent van Gogh, Le Moulin de la Galette:

[1886, oil on canvas, 55 x 38.5 cm, Private Collection], [1886, oil on canvas, 38.5 x 46 cm, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo], [1886, oil on canvas, 61 x 50 cm, Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires], [1887, oil on canvas, 46 x 38 cm, Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh] (1, 2, 3, 4)

This is only a selection of the many paintings executed by Van Gogh depicting the famous Moulin de la Galette windmill, located near the Montmartre apartment the artist shared with his brother, Theo. The styles here are really quite different; it’s hard to believe all four paintings are by the same artist!

(via rhaegartargaryen)

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How then can one expect the state to solve the problem of violence against women, when it constantly recapitulates its own history of colonialism, racism, and war? How can we ask the state to intervene when, in fact, its armed forces have always practiced rape and battery against “enemy” women? In fact, sexual and intimate violence against women has been a central military tactic of war and domination.

Yet the approach of the neoliberal state is to incorporate women into these agencies of violence—to integrate the armed forces and the police.

"

— Angela Davis, "The Color of Violence Against Women" (via wocinsolidarity)

(Fonte: so-treu, via susurrations)

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"He was healthier than the rest of us, but when you listened with the stethoscope you could hear the tears bubbling inside his heart."

— Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez (via pocketsfullofsand)

(via yung-pali)

Tags: marquez
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yung-pali:

tangerinatropical:


Gabriel García Márquez   March 6, 1927- April 17, 2014

:(((

Rest in Peace :(

yung-pali:

tangerinatropical:

Gabriel García Márquez   March 6, 1927- April 17, 2014

:(((

Rest in Peace :(

(Fonte: firsttimeuser)

Tags: :ccccc
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Use of the @ Symbol

lati-negros:

With the virtual uses and changing of language online it’s important we note how we are using the @ symbol in our name and in the things we are creating and writing. For many of you this is “common knowledge,” but the reality is that some folks have not ever really thought about why this symbol is important.

We think the @ symbol is important because it represents gender neutrality, gender inclusion, and disrupts the misogynistic ways language privileges men, masculinity, and things that are considered “male.”As many Latin@ scholars have stated and argued, especially Anzaldua, “Language is a male discourse” (p. 54, Borderlands/La Frontera). In the Spanish language, grammatically, if there is one man present in a room or area filled with women (a man of any age, a boy, a child, etc.) instead of using the “feminine” form of the language often using an “a” (i.e. una or nosotras) a masculine “o” is used (i.e. nosotros or the absence of the “a” such as un).

Utilizing the @ in this way challenges these grammatical “rules” that are embedded in a legacy of privileging men, masculinity and maleness. It is also part of a legacy that includes and recognizes our gender queer and trans* community members versus erasing them by constantly using a language embedded in a gender binary/dichotomy.

The @ is useful not only in discussing Latinidad, but also discussing how Blackness and African identity intersects as well. Often when we see terms discussing LatiNegr@s in various ways and using other self-identifiers they are still using a masculine version of “Afro” such as “Afro-Latin@”. This is a preference by some, and I’d like to argue this is also a way of privileging men and masculinity in the English language. Afr@Latin@ is a valid term and form to use when discussing our identities as well. Just as AfraLatina is valid. Why must the African in us also remain masculine?

The questions still exist of how to actually speak the @ sign and this has yet to really be resolved. How have others negotiated this?

(written by Bianca)

(via sinidentidades)

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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Justice for Alfred Wright! Stop racist lynchings!

By Gloria Rubac

East Texas, long known for its racism and active Ku Klux Klan terrorism, has made headlines again. A young Black physical therapist named Alfred Wright called his spouse on Nov. 7 to say his truck had broken down. The 27-year-old had recently begun doing home visits in Jasper and neighboring counties. When his family went to pick him up in Hemphill, an hour from Jasper, he had vanished.

The next day his scrubs and watch were found on a ranch near where his truck had broken down. The Sabine County sheriff, police and firefighters began searching for Wright, but after only four days they said they’d run out of funds and called off the search.

Wright’s family and friends began their own search and found him 19 days later. His mutilated body was on the same land that had supposedly been carefully searched. Left wearing only his boxer briefs, Wright’s left ear had been cut off and his eyes gouged out. Three front teeth and his tongue were missing, and his throat was slit. Yet the medical examiner ruled his death an accident due to drug overdose.

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booooooom:

Panchita Zorolla by William Strang (1916)

booooooom:

Panchita Zorolla by William Strang (1916)

(via queerliness)

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"Malcolm [X] was one of the most beautiful and one of the most gentle men I met in all my life. He asked the boy a question which I now present to you: If you are a citizen, why do you have to fight for your civil rights? If you’re fighting for your civil rights, that means you’re not a citizen. In fact, the legality of this country has never had anything to do with its former slaves. We are still governed by the slave codes."

— James Baldwin on Malcolm X, 1979. (via floricanto-desnuda)

(Fonte: c-span.org, via bankuei)

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gillyskerbz:

There is a light and it never goes out

gillyskerbz:

There is a light and it never goes out

(via faimi)